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GCSE (14-16 Years Old) Lesson Resources

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Undergraduate Full time Part time. Parents and partners Repayment Advanced Learner Loan. Turn on thread page Beta Toggle. GCSE History coursework watch. Starting uni is full of surprises: Start new discussion Reply. Raddy49 Follow 4 followers 11 badges Send a private message to Raddy Follow 1 Many thanks in advance.

Decerto Follow 20 followers 3 badges Send a private message to Decerto. Follow 2 Follow 3 Original post by Decerto It depends on the other modules and the amount of UMS marks once you have completed all coursework and exams. Are you not allowed to redo coursework? Follow 4 Or is it not possible to figure that out? Although I will double check with the History department!

When they calculate your overall grade do you think they utilise the amount of UMS points or the actual grade? Thank you for your help. Last edited by Decerto; at Chlorophile Follow followers 19 badges Send a private message to Chlorophile. Follow 5 Last edited by Chlorophile; at Follow 6 To calculate your grade, they add all the UMS marks you get from all the coursework and exams and then give you a grade based on the UMS grade boundaries.

Follow 7 Follow 8 Original post by Raddy49 Ah right, of course that makes sense! Follow 9 Rabiia Follow 0 followers 0 badges Send a private message to Rabiia.

The list of currently available GCSE subjects is much shorter than before the reforms, as the new qualifications in England all have core requirements set by the regulator, Ofqual, for each subject. In addition, there are several subjects where only one board offers qualifications, including some that are only available in one country of the UK for that reason.

The following lists are sourced from the exam board websites. These are the requirements for achieving the English Baccalaureate headline measure in league tables, from onwards.

The Baccalaureate itself does not garner a certificate for students. Other subjects, especially religious studies, computer science, or physical education, may be compulsory in some schools as these subjects form part of the National Curriculum at Key Stage 4. Level 1 and Level 2. These two levels roughly correspond, respectively, to foundation and higher tier in tiered GCSE qualifications. Formerly, many subjects were tiered, but with the mids reform, the number of tiered subjects reduced dramatically, including the removal of tiering from the GCSE English specifications.

Untiered papers allow any grade to be achieved. Coursework and controlled assessment tasks are always untiered.

In the past, mathematics qualifications offered a different set of tiers, with three. This eventually changed to match the tiers in all other GCSE qualifications. When GCSEs were first introduced in , they were graded on a letter scale in each subject: These grades were initially set such that a GCSE grade C was equivalent to an O-Level grade C or a CSE grade 1, though changes in marking criteria and boundaries over the years mean that this comparison is only approximate.

Infrequently, X and Q grades are awarded. X indicates that a course was not completed in full, and therefore an appropriate grade cannot be calculated. The Q query grade is a temporary grade that requires the school to contact the examining body. These latter two grades are both usually provisional, and are replaced with a regular grade once any issues have been resolved. In some cases, this may lead to the student losing all marks for that paper or course.

These grades are most common in subjects which discuss ethical issues, such as biology, religious studies, and citizenship.

In foundation tier papers, the student can obtain a maximum grade of a C, while in a higher tier paper, they can achieve a minimum grade of a D. If a higher tier candidate misses the D grade by a small margin, they are awarded an E. Otherwise, the grade below E in these papers is U. In untiered papers, students can achieve any grade in the scheme.

This scheme is being phased out in England, but remains in Wales and Northern Ireland. From in England and in Wales and Northern Ireland on qualifications from the English boards , some GCSEs are now assessed on a 9-point scale, using numbers from 9 to 1, and, like before, a U unclassified grade for achievement below the minimum pass mark.

The former C grade is set at grade 4 and the lower end of grade 5, with grade 5 being considered a "good pass" under the new scheme. Although fewer qualifications have tiered examinations than before, the tiering system still exists. At foundation tier, the grades 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are available, while at higher tier, the grades 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 are targeted.

Once again, if a higher tier student misses the grade 4 mark by a small margin, they are awarded a grade 3, and controlled assessment and coursework tasks are untiered. GCSE results are published by the examination board in August, for the previous exam series in April to June of the same year. Some boards and schools release results online, although many still require students to attend in person to collect their results from the centre they sat exams at.

These results then go on to inform league tables published in the following academic year, with headline performance metrics for each school. This allowed for students to take some units of a GCSE before the final examination series, and thus gave indication of progress and ability at various stages, as well as allowing for students to resit exams in which they did not score as highly, in order to boost their grade, before receiving the qualification.

Various qualifications were available as both modular and linear schemes, and schools could choose whichever fit best for them. Under the Conservative government of David Cameron, and Education Secretary Michael Gove, reforms were initiated which converted all GCSEs from for assessment from to de facto linear schemes, in advance of the introduction of new specifications between and for first assessment from to Both modular and linear assessment have been politically contentious, and the opposition Labour Party UK , and particularly the former MP Tristram Hunt stated that it was their policy that such reforms be halted and reversed, maintaining modular assessment in both GCSEs and A-Levels.

In some subjects, one or more controlled assessment or coursework assignments may also be completed. These may contribute either a small or large proportion of the final grade. In practical and performance subjects, they generally have a heavier weighting to reflect the difficulty and potential unfairness of conducting examinations in these areas.

In the past, these were available in a variety of subjects, including extended writing in English, the sciences, business, and foreign languages; practical assessment in the sciences and technology subjects; and speaking assessments in languages. Since the s reform, the availability has been cut back, with mostly only design and technology subjects and performing arts retaining their controlled assessment contributions. In English, the spoken language assessment has been downgraded to an endorsement which is reported separately on the English certificate, not contributing to the grade.

The balance between controlled assessment and examinations is contentious, with the time needing to be set aside for coursework sessions being seen as a burden on the school timetable. However, the use of controlled assessment allows for the marking of some work outside of examination season, and can ease the burden on the student to perform well on the day of the examination.

Any of the above must be approved by the examination board. Other forms of help are available with the agreement of the examination board, but the above are the most common. If a student is ill or an unforeseen circumstance occurs that may affect their performance in an examination, they can apply for special consideration from the examination board.

The procedures vary depending on how much the student has completed [ clarification needed ] , but in the case of sitting an examination, they may receive a percentage increase on their grade [ clarification needed ] to reflect this, or a consideration of their coursework and other assessment alongside their predicted grades, to calculate a fair grade based on their other attainment.

Most universities, in addition to their post requirements, seek that their candidates have grades of C or 4 or higher in GCSE English and mathematics. Many of those who achieve below this standard will later retake GCSE English and mathematics to improve their grade. A U, X, or Q grade does not award a qualification. Level 2 qualifications are much more sought-after, and generally form minimum requirements for jobs and further study expectations.

The education systems of current and former British territories, such as Gibraltar , [34] and Nigeria, also offer the qualification, as supplied by the same examination boards. Other former British colonies, such as Singapore and Zimbabwe , continue to use the O-Level qualification.

In the United States, the high school diploma is required for entry to college. As A-Levels are generally expected for university admission, the high school diploma is not considered enough for university entry in the UK. Gender bias is another area of concern. Department of Education data shows that the relative performance gap between girls and boys widened significantly under GCSEs, compared with O-Levels. The declining number of pupils studying foreign languages in the UK has been a major concern of educational experts for many years.

Moreover, the publication of "soft" subjects e. Critical Thinking, General Studies etc. Mathematics, Sciences, Languages for GCSEs and A-Levels by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge has created an ongoing educational debate where, on the one hand, many educational experts would support this "division of importance" whereas, on the other hand, many head teachers would not only disagree but actually "oppose a move to solely traditional academic GCSE and A-Level subjects".

When the GCSE system was introduced, there were comments that it was a dumbing down from the previous GCE O-Level system as it took the focus away from the theoretical side of many subjects, and taught pupils about real-world implications and issues relating to ICT and citizenship.

In addition, the proportions of candidates awarded high grades at GCSE have been rising for many years, which critics attribute to grade inflation. One of the important differences between previous educational qualifications and the earlier grading of A-Levels and the later GCSE qualifications was supposed to be a move from norm-referenced marking to criterion-referenced marking. With criterion-referenced grades, in theory, all candidates who achieve the criteria can achieve the grade.

The incorporation of GCSE awards into school league tables, and the setting of targets at school level at above national average levels of attainment, has been criticised. This target was reached nationally about 20 years later. This was achieved with the help of equivalent and largely vocational qualifications. However several teachers, experts, and students posted the solution to the question on the media. In another case, concerning the GCSE biology exam, there were complaints about the apparent lack of biology content in the exam.

This serious flaw in the question confused many of the students. OCR accepted responsibility and claimed no pupil would be disadvantaged. The question was worth 40 marks. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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GCSE: History. Browse by. Category: History Projects (1,) Modern World Marked by Teachers has an amazing range of History essay examples which will really help you in developing your written skills in the subject and will enable you to get the very best from your course. If you do take History GCSE it will be great preparation for. Homework help medieval. adult-dating-simulation-games-2016.tk Coursework, Essay & Homework assistance including assignments fully Marked by Teachers and Peers. Study Guides. The IGCSE has been developed to be more relevant to students learning history coursework help gcse in an ‘international’ or non-UK context Home educators can start GCSE courses at any age.

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GCSE coursework help and sample essays The following are tips for GCSE coursework. The tips are not for any specific subject but a general idea for content to include in all of your coursework. Oct 02,  · Hey there, sorry if this question sounds really stupid but I am still a bit confused about my History grade We got our coursework marks back which is 25%.