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❶Mother pandas often have twins but can only care for one cub at a time, so the workers at the panda nu They are also able to answer questions posed to them by those students.

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Because we take our job seriously and offer professional service, we pay for access to certain large databases that offer academic resources on all topics. By allowing our writer access to these databases of academic resources, we guarantee that all topics can be delivered and also the quality of your paper is assured. Then pass each student a sheet of nice stationery. Have the students write return letters to you.

In this letter, they will need to answer some of your questions and tell you about themselves. This is a great way to get to know each other in a personal way! Mail the letter to students before school starts, and enclose a sheet of stationery for kids to write you back. Each piece should have a matching piece of the same length. There should be enough pieces so that each student will have one. Then give each student one piece of string, and challenge each student to find the other student who has a string of the same length.

After students find their matches, they can take turns introducing themselves to one another. You can provide a list of questions to help students "break the ice," or students can come up with their own. You might extend the activity by having each student introduce his or her partner to the class. Give each student a slip of paper with the name of an animal on it. Then give students instructions for the activity: No talking is allowed.

The students might hesitate initially, but that hesitation soon gives way to a cacophony of sound as the kids moo, snort, and giggle their way into groups. The end result is that students have found their way into their homerooms or advisory groups for the school year, and the initial barriers to good teamwork have already been broken. Hold a large ball of yarn.

Start by telling the students something about yourself. Then roll the ball of yarn to a student without letting go of the end of the yarn.

The student who gets the ball of yarn tells his or her name and something good about himself or herself. Then the student rolls the yarn to somebody else, holding on to the strand of yarn. Soon students have created a giant web. After everyone has spoken, you and all the students stand up, continuing to hold the yarn. Start a discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of teamwork -- for example, the students need to work together and not let others down.

Questions might include the following: What is your name? Where were you born? How many brothers or sisters do you have? What are their names? Do you have any pets? Pair students, and have each student interview his or her partner and record the responses. Then have each student use the interview responses to write a "dictionary definition" of his or her partner to include in a Student Dictionary.

You might model this activity by creating a sample dictionary definition about yourself. Born in Riverside, California. No brothers or sisters. Have students bring in small pictures of themselves to paste next to their entries in the Student Dictionary. Bind the definitions into a book, and display it at back-to-school night. Ask each student to write a brief description of his or her physical characteristics on one index card and his or her name on the other.

Physical characteristics usually do not include clothing, but if you teach the primary grades, you might allow students to include clothing in their descriptions. Put all the physical characteristic index cards in a shoe box, mix them up, and distribute one card to each student, making sure that no student gets his or her own card.

Give students ten minutes to search for the person who fits the description on the card they hold. There is no talking during this activity, but students can walk around the room. At the end of the activity, tell students to write on the card the name of the student who best matches the description. Then have students share their results. How many students guessed correctly? Patricia McHugh, John W. Set up a circle of chairs with one less chair than the number of students in the class.

Play music as the students circle around the chairs. When the music stops, the students must sit in a seat. Unlike the traditional game, the person without a seat is not out. Instead, someone must make room for that person. Then remove another seat and start the music again.

You can play this game outside, and you can end it whenever you wish. Afterward, stress the teamwork and cooperation the game took, and how students needed to accept one another to be successful.

Reinforce that idea by repeating this game throughout the year. Danielle Weston, Willard School, Sanford, Maine Hands-On Activity Have students begin this activity by listing at least 25 words that describe them and the things they like.

No sentences allowed, just words! Then ask each student to use a dark pen to trace the pattern of his or her hand with the fingers spread apart. Provide another sheet of paper that the student can place on top of the tracing.

Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. Direct students to use the outlines as guides and to write their words around it. Provide students a variety of different colored pencils or markers to use as they write. Then invite students to share their work with the class.

They might cut out the hand outlines and mount them on construction paper so you can display the hands for open house. Last year, I discovered the cure for this dreaded classroom contagion: I created a weeklong breather based on an art form right out of the s coffeehouse era. My students and I were about to embark on an adventure in poetic exploration and self-expression. We were going to have a poetry slam.

To help my students get on board, I explained that a poetry slam is an event in which poets perform their work and are judged by members of an audience. My sixth and seventh graders sat intrigued as I told them that although poetry slams gained fame in Chicago in the s, they really originated in ancient Greek times.

The students enjoyed learning about the active role an audience plays in a traditional poetry slam. Fun-loving middle school students could easily picture themselves entering into poetry performances by snapping their fingers, moving their bodies to the rhythm, or even booing. In preparation for our own poetry slam, we transformed our classroom into a vintage s coffeehouse by rearranging desks into cozy tables covered with paper tablecloths and candles.

Students volunteered to bring doughnuts and hot chocolate. On the day before the big event, students decorated their tablecloths with slogans and various forms of graffiti.

We all realized that year-old egos wouldnt survive booing and heckling, so students suggested that audience participation be limited to applause -- a suggestion that was quickly accepted by all. We enlisted the help of a few teachers who volunteered to give up their prep periods to listen to and score students performances. Students spent several periods looking for a poem that spoke to them and preparing the poem for presentation. Others decided to write their own poems. Simple benchmarks were agreed upon:.

Students arrived full of anticipation on the morning of our poetry slam. As they entered the candle-lit classroom, they were treated to the sounds of one of our middle school teachers playing songs including Neil Youngs Horse With No Name and John Lennons Imagine on his guitar. Students munched on doughnuts as they pondered the messages of the song lyrics and prepared themselves for their performances.

The students language arts teacher started things off by performing a soul-searching poem he had penned during his own confused middle school years. That poem, written 20 years ago, surprised the students because it expressed so many of the same questions and doubts they have. The poem helped break the ice, calm some nerves, and set the tone for the day.

Have you seen these Voice of Experience essays from previous weeks? Searching for Voices Care to reflect on a classroom experience that opened your eyes? Click here to learn more. Each student had his or her turn in the intense spotlight. It was there that I witnessed in many of those students a responsive side I had rarely observed before.

Strong emotions were voiced, fears were expressed, and an abundance of rich vocabulary flew as they spoke words chock-full of meaning and message. Not only did we hear selections of Edgar Allen Poe, Robert Browning, and Jack Prelutsky, we also listened to original poetry that momentarily exposed a level vulnerability rarely seen in year-olds.

As the poetry slam drew to an end, it occurred to me that we had just spent 80 minutes in a kinder, gentler place -- a place where we were free to share our innermost thoughts. A poetry slam could also serve as a fund-raising activity or parents-night event. Poetry Slam Lesson Plan Create poems using words cut from newspapers, read the poems in the poetry slam format, and then compile the poems into a book. In addition to teaching sixth grade math, Brenda works with her staff in the area of technology integration.

Brenda is a teacher-editor for Midlink magazine. More than 1, FREE lessons. PD content to get you through the day. Download without a subscription. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips. Receive timely lesson ideas and PD tips Thank you for subscribing to the Educationworld. Classroom Problem Solver Dr. Ken Shore School Issues: One of the tablecloths that draped tables on poetry slam day.

Click on the image to view a larger version of it. Simple benchmarks were agreed upon: Each student performance would be two to three minutes in length. Performances would make effective use of dynamics and pacing. Students would clearly articulate their words. Students would make appropriate use of gestures to convey the message or feeling of their poems. Each student would partially at least one minute or completely memorize their poem.

No props, costumes, or musical instruments of any kind would be allowed; this would be poetry in its purest form. More Voices of Experience! Trending Icebreakers Volume 5: Most fun of all, the opening days of school are an opportunity to get to know a whole new group of kids!

What will you do during those first few days of school? What activities might you do to help you get to know your new students? What activities will help students get to know you and one another? For the last three years, Education World has presented a new group of getting-to-know-you ideas -- or icebreakers -- for those first days of school. Here are 19 ideas -- ideas tried and tested by Education World readers -- to help develop classroom camaraderie during the opening days of school. Opening-Day Letter Still looking for more ideas?

Write a letter to your students. In that letter, introduce yourself to students. In addition, tell students a few personal things about yourself; for example, your likes and dislikes, what you did over the summer, and your hobbies. Ask questions throughout the letter. You might ask what students like most about school, what they did during the summer, what their goals for the new school year are, or what they are really good at.

In your letter, be sure to model the correct parts of a friendly letter! On the first day of school, display your letter on an overhead projector. Then pass each student a sheet of nice stationery. Have the students write return letters to you. In this letter, they will need to answer some of your questions and tell you about themselves.

This is a great way to get to know each other in a personal way! Mail the letter to students before school starts, and enclose a sheet of stationery for kids to write you back. Each piece should have a matching piece of the same length. There should be enough pieces so that each student will have one. Then give each student one piece of string, and challenge each student to find the other student who has a string of the same length.

After students find their matches, they can take turns introducing themselves to one another. You can provide a list of questions to help students "break the ice," or students can come up with their own. You might extend the activity by having each student introduce his or her partner to the class. Give each student a slip of paper with the name of an animal on it.


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Title - Music & Emotions Unit By - B.A. Primary Subject - Music Secondary Subjects - Art, Language Arts Grade Level - 4 (adaptable) Lesson 1 (4th grade) Topic. National Poetry Month Build grammar skills using this article about Jack Prelutsky and his poems. Click for a PDF (portable document format) printable version of this Every-Day Edit activity. Scroll down or click for work sheet text and answer key.. Click for our archive of .

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My students and I were about to embark on an adventure in poetic exploration and self-expression. We were going to have a poetry slam. Great Illustrated Books. Books for Babies; Storybooks; Easy Kid Reads; Just the Facts; STORYBOOKS.